Do You Have What It Takes to Be an RVer?

By Alyssa Padgett

Not everyone is cut out to be an RVer. These are six qualities I think you need to have to enjoy RVing. 

To most people who don’t RV, there’s a certain stigma associated with RVers. You either must be retired with nothing to do, or so poor that you live in a trailer just to survive.

I suppose the third option is that you’re a hippie or a bum driving around in search of yourself.

In my husband’s hometown in Texas, residents recently petitioned to get an RV park off I-10 closed because it was too close to a school. They worried it would attract those types of people.

Since joining the RV community last year, I rolled my eyes at the residents who see RVers as trashy or likely criminals. After staying in RV parks across 48 states, I know for certain that most RVers are nothing like that.

In fact, RVers are some of the nicest people who I’ve had the chance to meet.

It takes a special kind of person to be an RVer. You must be a cut above most of humanity, showing exemplary compassion and inner-strength.

Here are six qualities I think you need to have to be an RVer:

1.) You aren’t attached to objects.

Four days after my wedding,  I started full-time RVing. All my wedding presents are tucked away in a closet in my parent’s house, unused.

But as an RVer, you know that you don’t need a KitchenAid mixer and a dozen shiny pots and pans. You only pack the essentials. Anything else is clutter!

You should be able to simplify, getting rid of what you don’t need and freeing up your cabinet space to fit all the cool souvenirs you’ll find while traveling. When we first hit the road, we created a “One-Month Rule.”

If we hadn’t used something in the first month after we bought it, we packed it in a box and shipped it home.

2.) You’re not high-maintenance. 

To be an RVer, you must be pretty low maintenance. You’re okay with hand washing all your dishes instead of using a dishwasher. Carrying your clothes to the laundry center at the RV park is fine with you. That’s just part of RV life!

You also don’t mind sweeping or vacuuming the dirt and mud that finds its way inside your rig. And we don’t always need to stay at fancy RV resorts—national parks are just fine with us! We’re here for the adventure of travel, not the luxury of it all.

 3.) You love America.

This might sound funny but let me explain. You must see the good and the beauty of the world if you plan on RVing. Have you ever met those people who always find something wrong with everything?

“The sun is too bright. It’s too windy. This would be beautiful if…” Those people aren’t cut out for RVing.

RVers may complain about unlevel sites, but our glass is always half full (probably with beer). We don’t complain about America. We can’t wait to keep exploring the country! We love the world around us for its freedom and beauty.

 4.) You keep your cool.

Picture this: You’re following the directions from a GPS unit to your destination.

Your rig is cruising along the road with your car towing behind. Suddenly, you’re in a construction zone, the road narrows, the street you’re supposed to turn on is closed, you’re lost, and you’ve got no other choice than to make a U-turn. (If you’ve RVed for any amount of time, you can picture this vividly as it’s probably happened to you at least once before!)

My cousins once missed a turn (using a real map, not a GPS) and found themselves on a small mountain road in Colorado with snow banks on either side. They had to unhook their Honda CR-V and U-turn their 26-foot Super C on this snowy mountain road and retrace their tracks down the hill.

If you’re prone to stress or have ever been called a “hot-head,” RVing isn’t for you. As an RVer, you’ve got to be able to keep your cool in these situations.

When your dump hose breaks – when it rains, and your RV gets stuck in the mud – a good RVer must be level headed.

5.) You want to help others.

 “We have a problem,” my husband said walking back inside the RV.

After dry camping in Grand Teton National Park for four days, he was dumping our tank. “Our hose just snapped in half. We have another one, but I have no idea how to switch them out, and we don’t have cell phone service to find out how.”

Fortunately, a couple in a small class B was dumping their tank at the station in front of us. They came to our rescue!

For the next twenty minutes, Kelly showed my husband how to change out the hose.

As we’ve encountered troubles in our travels, we’ve never worried because there’s always a fellow RVer around to help. Whether it’s something simple like backing up your RV or something as complex as burping your fridge, RVers are always willing to help one another.

6.) You’re friendly.

I’ve met some grumpy RV park owners, but rarely do you meet a mean RVer.

Most RVers are friendly, and eager to meet new people on the road. If you’re not friendly or don’t want to spend your evening chatting with your neighbor about your rig, then you’re not cut out for RVing.

RVers love hanging out with strangers and making new friends.

So, how do you rank? Are you cut out for RVing?

2 thoughts on “Do You Have What It Takes to Be an RVer?

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